• Elbow Arthroscopy
  • Arthritis Management
    (Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis)
  • Wrist Arthroscopy
  • Tendon Transfers
  • Hand Infections
  • Hand, Wrist & Elbow Trauma
  • Microvascular Surgery
  • Sports Injury Managementof the Hand, Wrist and Elbow
  • Performing Arts Medicine
  • Fingertip Injuries

Hand & Wrist

Mallet Finger

Mallet finger is a condition where the end of the finger is bent and does not straighten. It occurs when the extensor tendon on the back of the finger is damaged. The finger joint is a hinge-joint that allows bending and straightening of the fingers.

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Dupuytrens Contracture

Dupuytren's contracture is thickening of the fibrous tissue layer under the skin of palms, fingers, and hands which leads to curving of the finger. It is caused due to the excessive production of collagen which gets deposited under the skin. Hereditary factors, excessive alcohol consumption, diabetes, seizures, and increased age may increase the risk of developing the condition.

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Flexor Tendon Injuries

Tendons are the bands of fibrous connective tissue that connect muscles to bone. Tendons aid in movement of the fingers, hand and all other body parts.

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Finger Fractures

Fingers are fine structures of the human body which assist in daily routine activities through coordinated movements. Any abnormality affecting the fingers can have a huge impact on quality of life of the patient. A finger fracture is usually a minor injury but if left untreated it may lead to major consequences due to interference with the specialized functions such as grasping or manipulating objects in the palm.

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Metacarpal Fractures

Metacarpal fracture is a condition characterized by the breakage or dislocation of the long hand bones called metacarpals that form the skeleton of the palm. Metacarpal fractures can damage associated soft tissues such as cartilage, ligament, tendons, joint capsule, as well as adjoining nerves.

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Scaphoid Fracture

The scaphoid bone is a small, boat-shaped bone in the wrist, which, along with 7 other bones, forms the wrist joint. It is present on the thumb side of the wrist causing it to be at a high risk for fractures. A scaphoid fracture is usually seen in young men aged 20 to 30 years. They can occur at two places: near the thumb or near the forearm.

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Wrist Fracture

The wrist is comprised of two bones in the forearm, the radius and ulna, and eight tiny carpal bones in the palm. The bones meet to form multiple large and small joints. A wrist fracture refers to a break in one or more of these bones.

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De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

The muscles and bones of the hand are connected by thick flexible tissue called tendons. Tendons are covered by a thin soft sheath of tissue known as synovium. Extensor pollicis brevis and abductor pollicis longus are two tendons located on the thumb side of the wrist. Inflammation and swelling of the tendon sheaths puts pressure on the adjacent nerves and leads to pain and numbness in the thumb side of the wrist.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a common, painful, progressive condition that is caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist area.

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Trigger Finger

The ability to bend the fingers is governed by supportive tendons that connect muscles to the bones of the fingers. The tendons run along the length of the bone and are kept in place at intervals by tunnels of ligaments called pulleys. When the fingers bend or are straightened, a slippery coating called tenosynovium helps the tendons smoothly glide through the ligaments with reduced friction.

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Total Wrist Arthrodesis

Arthrodesis is the surgical immobilization of a joint by the fusion of the adjacent bones. Total wrist arthrodesis, also known as wrist fusion is a surgical procedure in which the wrist joint is stabilized or immobilized by fusing the forearm bone (radius) with the small bones of the wrist.

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Wrist Joint Replacement

Wrist joint replacement surgery, also referred to as total wrist arthroplasty, involves replacement of a severe arthritic wrist joint with an artificial joint made of metal and plastic components. It relieves pain and restores function when conservative treatment fails to provide relief.

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Artificial Finger Joint Replacement

Finger joints are essential for many activities, and arthritis in this area can cause significant joint damage and deformity. Artificial finger joint replacement is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of an arthritic or damaged finger joint and replacement with an artificial prosthesis.

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Ganglion Cyst Removal

Ganglion cysts are fluid-filled lumps that most commonly develop along the tendons or joints of wrists or hands. It looks like a water balloon on a stalk and contains a clear fluid or gelatinous material. Ganglion cysts are noncancerous, generally harmless and disappear without any treatment.

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Finger Joint Fusion

Ganglion cysts are fluid-filled lumps that most commonly develop along the tendons or joints of wrists or hands. It looks like a water balloon on a stalk and contains a clear fluid or gelatinous material. Ganglion cysts are noncancerous, generally harmless and disappear without any treatment.

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